Only Lovers Left Alive....

The most remarkable thing about Jim Jarmusch's modern vampire movie (the only non-Japanese movie I've seen all month) was the way in which street landscapes where represented. The nighttime photography from a moving vehicle, of Detroit, created an authentic awareness and respect of space. Similarly but with equal contrast, Tangiers was an opium infused hallucination, one that was a throwback to expressionist soundstage production design and mis-en-scene. 

Using what amounted to a spotlight as the car moved through the night was an interesting choice and certainly one born out of necessity. You could rather keep the scene very dark, or with a light on a moving vehicle, do what in essence, wedding videographers do with those small LED lights attached to a camera. Of course, this is not as simple, but that's probably what was going on.

On a Hollywood Production, the whole street would have to be lit to mimic the "feeling" of nighttime by making sure everything damn thing was completely visible and exposed "the right way".  Of course this is a generalization, but If you've ever scene a large production take up a block on Hollywood Blvd, or Downtown LA, you are keenly aware of the fact that enough amps are used to light up Kabul for a week.

The other peculiar thing I found about this movie is Jarmusch's subtle disdain of the internet and it's culture of accessibility. Most artist dealing with the enormous digitization of the world probably feel nostalgic about the old days, whereby we couldn't find every image ever created on Youtube or Tumblr. 

Memory is but a memory. But memory is often more beautiful then the real thing.

 digital all the way baby!

digital all the way baby!